Students Speaking On…

Block Grants: Fiscal Conservatism Repackaged as Flexibility

This blog post was written by Kamika Shaw, a Student in 2017 Spring Semester of Harvard Law School’s Public Health Law and Policy Seminar. By any measure, the state of the American health care system is in flux.[i] As part of a […]

An Accidental Case Study: Emily’s Bone Marrow Donation

This blog post was written by Nate Szyman, a Student in 2016 Fall Semester of Harvard Law School’s Public Health Law and Policy Seminar Recently I spent the day at the hospital with my wife, Emily, as she donated bone marrow […]

Food Insecurity on Campus

This blog post was written by Susanna Barron, a Student in 2016 Fall Semester of Harvard Law School’s Public Health Law and Policy Seminar. As I was reading the assigned articles about SNAP benefits, particularly those focused on the political rhetoric […]

Medicaid Expansion Might be in Danger, But It’s Still Worth Fighting For

This blog post was written by Denise Nakiyaga Babirye, a Student in 2016 Fall Semester of Harvard Law School’s Public Health Law and Policy Seminar.  I originally wrote this in October, prior to the election. While President-elect Trump seems committed to […]

The Unfortunate Interdependence Among Politics, Poverty and Health Care

This blog post was written by Namita Dhawan, a Student in 2017 Fall Semester of Harvard Law School’s Public Health Law and Policy Seminar.  Ideological differences between Republicans and Democrats have proved obstructive to the well-being of millions of Americans, particularly […]

Discretionary Programs: Reinforcing Health Care as a Good Rather Than a Right

This blog post was written by Megan Ma, a Student in 2017 Fall Semester of Harvard Law School’s Public Health Law and Policy Seminar.  A noticeable similarity across three discretionary programs – The Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program, Title X, and Veterans […]